We are all set to go for the World Solar Challenge! We have passed dynamic scrutineering and will be starting in position 28. Our trailer is packed and we are ready to depart on an adventure across the outback.

Dynamic scrutineering is very similar to static scrutineering in that it verifies the safety and regulation compliance of the car, but it does so through actual driving. The process is rather straight forward and well run. Each team is sent onto the track one by one. They then complete two laps of the track the first is for getting used to the current track conditions and then the second one is timed. This time is used for determining starting positions. After that the car pulls out to the drag strip that is tangent to the track. Here the driver must successful complete 2 U-turns, a slalom, and a brake test. If you pass all these tests safely and within the regulations you are ready for the Challenge this Sunday! We got a 2:25.5455, which put us in starting position 28. We aren’t too concerned about this though; this is an endurance challenge and not a race. We hope to start passing teams fairly early in the challenge, and nudge our way up the ranks.

After scrutineering we had some chances to get pictures with all of the teams and cars. All of our team was showing our team spirit, so we weren’t able to get any pictures of this really awesome spectacle. Don’t fret though as there were many many many photographers so some pictures from it will be easy to find. Such as this one from Solar Team Eindhoven:

To finish off the day we had the joy of packing all of our tools and supplies back into our trailer along with Arcturus. Now we are packed and ready for the challenge tomorrow and will be leaving at 0400 to get in our place for the start line. The team is excited for the adventure to come!

Fun fact of the day: Most of the Australian toilets we have seen do not in fact flush in the opposite direction as American toilets.In fact they don’t really produce a spiral flush but instead just flood the toilet bowl from the front and back. The jury is still out on what “scientific phenomenon” causes this.